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CQC announces new GP inspection model

Consultation opens on inspection frequency

June 15th 2017

Tagged: England CQC

By Ailsa Colquhoun

From November 2017 the CQC will use an updated assessment framework to inspect GP practices in England.

According to the CQC, the new assessment “simplifies the process for organisations that provide more than one type of service”.

For dispensing practices, and compared to the 2015 assessment framework, there are new and substantively changed key lines of enquiry (KLOE) for medicines safety, within an assessment area (S4) that is also changed to read: How does the provider ensure the proper and safe use of medicines, where the service is responsible?

The three new KLOEs are:

  • Are people’s medicines reconciled in line with current national guidance when transferring between locations or changing levels of care?
  • Are people receiving appropriate therapeutic drug and physical health monitoring with appropriate follow-up in accordance with current national guidance or evidence?
  • Are people’s medicines regularly reviewed including the use of ‘when required’ medicines?

Substantive changes are made to the following KLOEs

  • How are medicines and medicines-related stationery managed (that is, ordered, transported, stored and disposed of safely and securely)?
  • Are medicines appropriately prescribed, administered and/or supplied to people in line with the relevant legislation, current national guidance or best available evidence?
  • Do people receive specific advice about their medicines in line with current national guidance or evidence?
  • How does the service make sure that people receive their medicines as intended, and is this recorded appropriately?
  • Are people’s medicines reconciled in line with current national guidance when transferring between locations or changing levels of care?
  • Are people receiving appropriate therapeutic drug and physical health monitoring with appropriate follow-up in accordance with current national guidance or evidence?
  • Are people’s medicines regularly reviewed including the use of ‘when required’ medicines?

Carried over unchanged is the following KLE:

  • How does the service make sure that people’s behaviour is not controlled by excessive or inappropriate use of medicines?

View the updated assessment framework.

The updated assessment framework also gives the following ratings characteristics template for the S4 assessment:

Outstanding
Staff not only meet good practice standards in relation to national guidance, they also contribute to research and development of national guidance. Compliance with medicines policy and procedure is routinely monitored and action plans are always implemented promptly.

Good
Staff meet good practice standards described in relevant national guidance, including in relation to non-prescribed medicines. People receive their medicines as prescribed. The service involves them in regular medicines reviews. Staff manage medicines consistently and safely. Medicines are stored correctly, and disposed of safely. Staff keep accurate records of medicines.

Requires improvement
People do not always receive their medicines as prescribed. The service does not always follow relevant national guidelines around storing medicines  administering them, and disposing of them. This includes in relation to non-prescribed medicines.

Inadequate
People are at risk because staff do not administer medicines safely or people do not receive them as prescribed. Medicines are not ordered, transported or stored safely or securely.

The changes follow a consultation that took place at the beginning of the year to start to deliver the CQC’s vision of “more targeted, responsive and collaborative approach to regulation”.

In a second consultation, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) now proposes changes including to the frequency and intensity of its inspections.

The regulator proposes to widen its definition of ‘registered provider’ to include any related organisations to the registered provider, for example, a parent company that also has accountability for quality. This means that these organisations will also appear on the CQC register, and the public will be given information about who is accountable for the care being provided.

In terms of frequency, for providers rated as good or outstanding overall, the CQC will move to an inspection interval of up to five years. Providers with an overall rating of inadequate will be inspected every six months and those rated as requires improvement every 12 months, until they improve.

The closing date for all comments is Tuesday 8 August.   Questions can be emailed. Responses can be made online or by post to:

Freepost RTTE-JTBT-ZTHH

Next Phase Consultation

Care Quality Commission

151 Buckingham Palace Road

LONDON SW1W 9SZ

 

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